Faculty

Pr. Lex PAULSON

Co-founder, Executive director & Professor

Pr. Cathal O’Madagain

Scientific Director & Professor

Pr. Mark Klein

Affiliate professor

Pr. Emile Servan Schreiber

Affiliate professor

Professor Lex PAULSON

Co-founder of the School of Collective Intelligence, Dr. Paulson has trained leaders in government and business in over 20 countries. A mobilization strategist for the campaigns of Barack Obama and Emmanuel Macron, he studied political theory at Yale and Cambridge before earning his PhD at the Sorbonne. His work centers on leadership and democratic innovation.

“My work centers upon the design and facilitation of intelligent human systems, with a special focus on citizen consultations and small-group deliberation. Informed by antique political thought, in particular the design principles of Athenian and Roman political institutions, as well as the contemporary field of epistemic democracy, I have designed and accompanied a range of in-person and technology-assisted public consultations in the EU, Africa, and North America. I am interested in experimental methods to test the impact of narrative strategies and moral framing techniques on the efficacy of deliberations at small and large scales.”

Representative Publications : 

  • Paulson, L. (2019). Libera voluntas: the political origins of the free will argument in Cicero and Augustine, in Cicero’s Final Years Through the Ages(Leiden, publication forthcoming).
  • Paulson, L. & Zacherzewski, A. (2017). Empowered: Achieving the best digital future for society, work, and democracy in Europe. Official report to the European Commission Directorate-General for Communications Networks, Content and Technology.
  • Paulson, L. (2016). Review of Sean McConnell, Philosophical Life in Cicero’s Letters. Bryn Mawr Classical Review, BMCR 2016.07.28.
  • Paulson, L. (2014). Fostering peaceful and credible elections by enhancing the confidence of political parties and voters in the electoral process (Guinée-Conakry). Official report to the United Nations Development Program and European Commission.
  • Paulson, L. (2014). A Painted Republic: the constitutional innovations of Cicero’s De Legibus. Etica & Politica XVI (Dec. 2014), pp.307-340.

Professor Cathal O’MADAGAIN

Scientific director of the School of Collective Intelligence, professor O’Madagain earned a PhD in philosophy at the University of Toronto and after that worked for 8 years as a research psychologist at the Max Planck Institute in Germany, and the Ecole Superieure in Paris.

His work explores how human thought and knowledge depend on various kinds of social interaction. Current projects include work on the development of rationality in humans and great apes, and the role of reasons in the transmission of new technologies and ideas, which he is exploring with communities of farmers in rural Morocco.

“My work explores the impact of social interaction on our cognitive lives. This encompasses issues in the philosophy of mind and language, social epistemology, and the philosophy of evolutionary biology and developmental psychology. I undertake purely theoretical philosophy, and also experimental work with children, adults and our nearest evolutionary cousins, the great apes.

My work can be thought of as three interconnected projects, investigating: the impact of social interaction on the development of cognition; the ways in which coordination with others augments our epistemic abilities; and the building blocks of language and thought.”

Representative Publications

  • Walmsley, J. and O‘Madagain, C. (Joint first authors). (in press).The Worst Motive Fallacy. Psychological Science.
  • O‘Madagain, C. (in press). This is a Paper about Demonstratives. Philosophia.
  • O‘Madagain, C. Kachel, G and Strickland, B. (2019). The Origin of Pointing: Evidence for the Touch Hypothesis. Science Advances: Vol. 5, no. 7, eaav2558, DOI: 10.1126/sciadv.aav2558
  • Koymen, B. O‘Madagain, C., Domberg, A. and Tomasello, M. (2019). Young children’s ability to produce valid and relevant counter-arguments. Child Development, 10.1111/cdev.13338
  • Egré, P and O‘Madagain, C. (Joint first authors). (2019). Concept Utility. The Journal of Philosophy.
  • O‘Madagain, C. and Tomasello, M. (Joint first authors). (2019). Joint Attention to Mental Contents and the Social Origin of Reasoning. Synthese, 10.1007/s11229-019-02327-1

Professor Mark KLEIN

Dr. Mark Klein is a Professor in SCI as a research scientist at MIT Center for Collective Intelligence. His research is developing computer technologies that enable greater ‘collective intelligence’ in large groups faced with complex decisions.

“The goal of my research is to develop computer technologies that enable greater ‘collective intelligence’ in large groups faced with complex decisions. To do so, I draw from such fields as computer science/artificial intelligence, economics, sociology, operations research, and complexity science. My current projects focus on large-scale deliberation, crowdsourced idea filtering, and negotiation mechanisms for complex problems. I’ve also worked on computer-supported conflict management for collaborative design, design rationale capture, business process re-design, exception handling in workflow and multi-agent systems, and service discovery.”

Representative Publications 

  • Reyhan Aydoğan, Ivan Marsa-Maestre, Mark Klein, and Catholijn M. Jonker (2018). A Machine Learning Approach for Mechanism Selection in Complex Negotiations. 
  • Systems Science and Systems Engineering , 27:134–155. 
  • Spada, P., Iandoli, L., Quinto, I., Calabretta, R., & Klein, M. (2017). Argumentation vs Ideation in online political debate: evidence from an experiment of collective deliberation. New Media & Society. 
  • Klein, M., & Garca, A-C-B. (2015). High-Speed Idea Filtering With the Bag of Lemons. Decision Support Systems, 78(C):39-50. 
  • Marsa-Maestre, I., Klein, M., Jonker, C. M., Lopez-Carmona, M. A., & Aydogan, R. (2014). From Problems to Protocols: Towards a Negotiation Handbook. Decision Support Systems, 60:39-54. 
  • Klein, M. (2012). Enabling Large-Scale Deliberation Using Attention-Mediation Metrics. Computer-Supported Collaborative Work. 21(4):449-473 
  • Bernstein, A., M. Klein and T. Malone .(2012). Programming the Global Brain. Communications of the ACM 55(5). 

Professor Emile SERVAN-SCHREIBER

Dr. Emile Servan-Schreiber is an affiliate professor at SCI and a founding director of Hypermind, a leading prediction-markets company since 2000. His research and practice focus on applying crowd wisdom to forecasting and prioritization. He has participated in several large-scale research programs of the U.S. (IARPA) on crowd-based forecasting of geopolitical events. He earned a Ph.D in cognitive psychology at Carnegie Mellon (1991). His latest book is Supercollectif (Fayard, 2018).

“I research ways to exploit crowd wisdom, through prediction markets and related technologies, to make organizations smarter through more accurate forecasting, richer innovation, and better alignment. The research field covers at least (a) the development of new aggregation algorithms building on the existing state of the art, (b) the testing/training of individuals and crowds to push the forecasting envelope, (c) the efficient combination of collective intelligence and artificial intelligence.”

Representative Publications 

  • Servan-Schreiber, E. (2018). Supercollectif – La nouvelle puissance de nos intelligences. Fayard, Paris. 
  • Servan-Schreiber, E. (2017). Debunking Three Myths About Crowd-Based Forecasting. Collective Intelligence 2017, NYU Tandon. 
  • Atanasov, P., Rescober, P., Stone, E., Swift, S., Servan-Schreiber, E., Tetlock, P., Ungar, L., & Mellers, B. (2016). Distilling the Wisdom of Crowds: Prediction markets vs. Prediction Polls. Management Science, Articles in Advance, pp. 1-16. 
  • Servan-Schreiber, E., & Atanasov, P. (2016). Hypermind vs Big Data : Collective Intelligence Still Dominates Electoral Forecasting. Collective Intelligence 2015, Santa Clara. 
  • Servan-Schreiber, E. (2012). Prediction Markets: Trading Uncertainty for Collective Wisdom. In Collective Wisdom – Landemore, H., & Elster, J. (Eds). Cambridge University Press. 
  • Servan-Schreiber, E., Wolfers, J., Pennock, D., & Galebach, B. (2004). Prediciton Markets: Does Money Matter? Electronic Markets, 14(3): 243-251. 
Pr. Fatima Ezzahra Benmarrakchi

Assistant professor

James Winters

Assistant professor

Florencia Devoto

Affiliate professor

Brent Strickland

Affiliate professor

Professor FatimaZzahra BENMARRAKCHI

Dr FatimaEzzahra Benmarrakchi is an Assistant Professor at SCI . She received a PhD. in computer science from Chouaib Doukkali University. Her research focuses on how the use of technology can foster learning outcomes and improve cognitive and social skills for children with learning disabilities (e.g. Dyslexia) and Autism Spectrum Disorder.

In the SCI she is leading research on collaborative learning.

“My work is in the field of educational technology and special education, it focuses on how the use of ICT (Information and Communication technology) can improve learning. Exploring the potential benefits offered by ICT to support children with learning disabilities such as dyslexia. I have conducted a range of experimental research programs aimed at children with learning disabilities in order to developing interactive experiences that can motivate and help target learners.”

Representative Publications: 

Professor Brent STRICKLAND

Dr. Strickland is an affiliate professor at the School of Collective Intelligence and Africa Business School, and one of the original co-founders of the School of Collective Intelligence. He is also a tenured CNRS researcher at the Institut Jean Nicod/Departement d’Etudes Cognitives/ENS-Ulm/PSL in Paris, France. He holds a PhD in cognitive and developmental psychology from the Yale University Psychology Department. 

Core knowledge refers to a set of cognitive systems that appear very early in human development, universally across cultures, and are preserved by natural selection. My research asks how core knowledge continues to operate into adulthood in automatic and often unconscious ways, with a focus on perception, language, and decision making. I am additionally interested in how such core mechanisms may systematically affect human behavior at organizational or societal scale.”

Representative Publications: 

Professor James WINTERS

Dr. Winters is an Assistant Professor at the School of Collective Intelligence working in the domains of cognitive science, cultural evolution, and linguistics. Previously, he was a postdoctoral researcher at the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, and earned his PhD in Linguistics at the University of Edinburgh. His current research employs a variety of methodological tools (computational, statistical, and experimental) to investigate exploration-exploitation dynamics in cumulative cultural evolution.

“Why are humans the only species capable of open-ended, cumulative problem solving? How did this capacity evolve and become manifest in our language, technology, and culture? My research seeks to address such questions by drawing on theoretical and methodological approaches from cognitive science, evolutionary biology, and complexity science, with the explicit aim of capturing the relationship between individual-level processes and population-level patterns.”

Representative Publications 

Professor Florencia DEVOTO

Dr. Florencia is an affiliate professor at the School of Collective Intelligence. She undertakes experimental work in the field of development economics. She holds a PhD from the Paris School of Economics and an MPA/International Development from the Harvard Kennedy School.

“My research focuses on measuring the impacts of tools and policies on the decisions of poor households in developing countries and how these decisions may differ from those predicted by the classical economic theory. I conduct randomized control trials to explore a variety of questions in the areas of education, microfinance, female labor force participation and access to water. By conducting this work, I intend to contribute to the understanding of the mechanisms through which policies can help alleviating poverty.”

Representative Publications 

Sarah Alami

Research and Education Fellow

Jose Segovia Martins

Assistant Professor

Sarah ALAMI

Dr. Sarah is a Research and Education Fellow at the School of Collective Intelligence. She is an anthropologist and a biodemographer who conducts fieldwork with economically transitioning populations in Southeast Morocco and lowland Bolivia.

She holds an MA and a PhD in Anthropology from the university of California, Santa Barbara. Sarah studies a number of different topics relating to behavior and health.

Her current research projects are in one or more of the following areas: 

  • Kinship and marriage systems 
  • Evolution of human sociality and intergroup relationships 
  • Gender , gender norms and leadership 
  • Health, lifestyle change, and evolutionary demography

Professor Jose Segovia MARTIN

Dr. Jose Segovia-Martin is currently a Professor at the School of Collective Intelligence (M6 Polytechnic University) and a CNRS Research Associate at Complex Systems Institute of Paris Ile-de-France (ISC-PIF), where he also was a postdoc researcher. Previously, he completed his PhD in Cognitive Science at the Universitat de Barcelona. During his PhD he obtained relevant training in computational social science and mathematical engineering: a significant part of his research was developed at the Centre for Language Evolution (University of Edinburgh) and the Laland Lab (University of St.Andrews). 

“My scientific work concerns the evolution of collective behaviour. I use mathematical and computational models, as well as experiments and data science, to study the interaction between cognition, behaviour and social organisation, with a perspective rooted in cultural evolution and complex systems. My research interests span the domains of social cognition, behavioural economics, decision theory, computational biology and language evolution. I am interested in questions such as how social conventions emerge in the presence and absence of institutional incentives, what special features of human social learning and innovation enable cumulative cultural evolution, how different aggregation rules shape collective outcomes such as the degree of consensus and polarisation in a society, or how social dynamics and norms interfere with the quality of scientific production. These models, in combination with empirical verification and validation, provide a method to explore possible ways of estimating the economic and social trade-offs involved in preserving cultural diversity, addressing inequalities and improving governance.”

Representative Publications

Professor Lex PAULSON

Co-founder of the School of Collective Intelligence, Dr. Paulson has trained leaders in government and business in over 20 countries. A mobilization strategist for the campaigns of Barack Obama and Emmanuel Macron, he studied political theory at Yale and Cambridge before earning his PhD at the Sorbonne. His work centers on leadership and democratic innovation.

“My work centers upon the design and facilitation of intelligent human systems, with a special focus on citizen consultations and small-group deliberation. Informed by antique political thought, in particular the design principles of Athenian and Roman political institutions, as well as the contemporary field of epistemic democracy, I have designed and accompanied a range of in-person and technology-assisted public consultations in the EU, Africa, and North America. I am interested in experimental methods to test the impact of narrative strategies and moral framing techniques on the efficacy of deliberations at small and large scales.”

Representative Publications : 

  • Paulson, L. (2019). Libera voluntas: the political origins of the free will argument in Cicero and Augustine, in Cicero’s Final Years Through the Ages(Leiden, publication forthcoming).
  • Paulson, L. & Zacherzewski, A. (2017). Empowered: Achieving the best digital future for society, work, and democracy in Europe. Official report to the European Commission Directorate-General for Communications Networks, Content and Technology.
  • Paulson, L. (2016). Review of Sean McConnell, Philosophical Life in Cicero’s Letters. Bryn Mawr Classical Review, BMCR 2016.07.28.
  • Paulson, L. (2014). Fostering peaceful and credible elections by enhancing the confidence of political parties and voters in the electoral process (Guinée-Conakry). Official report to the United Nations Development Program and European Commission.
  • Paulson, L. (2014). A Painted Republic: the constitutional innovations of Cicero’s De Legibus. Etica & Politica XVI (Dec. 2014), pp.307-340.

Professor Cathal O’Madagain

Scientific director of the School of Collective Intelligence, professor O’Madagain earned a PhD in philosophy at the University of Toronto and after that worked for 8 years as a research psychologist at the Max Planck Institute in Germany, and the Ecole Superieure in Paris.

His work explores how human thought and knowledge depend on various kinds of social interaction. Current projects include work on the development of rationality in humans and great apes, and the role of reasons in the transmission of new technologies and ideas, which he is exploring with communities of farmers in rural Morocco.

“My work explores the impact of social interaction on our cognitive lives. This encompasses issues in the philosophy of mind and language, social epistemology, and the philosophy of evolutionary biology and developmental psychology. I undertake purely theoretical philosophy, and also experimental work with children, adults and our nearest evolutionary cousins, the great apes.

My work can be thought of as three interconnected projects, investigating: the impact of social interaction on the development of cognition; the ways in which coordination with others augments our epistemic abilities; and the building blocks of language and thought.”

Representative Publications

  • Walmsley, J. and O‘Madagain, C. (Joint first authors). (in press).The Worst Motive Fallacy. Psychological Science.
  • O‘Madagain, C. (in press). This is a Paper about Demonstratives. Philosophia.
  • O‘Madagain, C. Kachel, G and Strickland, B. (2019). The Origin of Pointing: Evidence for the Touch Hypothesis. Science Advances: Vol. 5, no. 7, eaav2558, DOI: 10.1126/sciadv.aav2558
  • Koymen, B. O‘Madagain, C., Domberg, A. and Tomasello, M. (2019). Young children’s ability to produce valid and relevant counter-arguments. Child Development, 10.1111/cdev.13338
  • Egré, P and O‘Madagain, C. (Joint first authors). (2019). Concept Utility. The Journal of Philosophy.
  • O‘Madagain, C. and Tomasello, M. (Joint first authors). (2019). Joint Attention to Mental Contents and the Social Origin of Reasoning. Synthese, 10.1007/s11229-019-02327-1

Professor Mark KLEIN

Dr. Mark Klein is a Professor in SCI as a research scientist at MIT Center for Collective Intelligence. His research is developing computer technologies that enable greater ‘collective intelligence’ in large groups faced with complex decisions.

“The goal of my research is to develop computer technologies that enable greater ‘collective intelligence’ in large groups faced with complex decisions. To do so, I draw from such fields as computer science/artificial intelligence, economics, sociology, operations research, and complexity science. My current projects focus on large-scale deliberation, crowdsourced idea filtering, and negotiation mechanisms for complex problems. I’ve also worked on computer-supported conflict management for collaborative design, design rationale capture, business process re-design, exception handling in workflow and multi-agent systems, and service discovery.”

Representative Publications 

  • Reyhan Aydoğan, Ivan Marsa-Maestre, Mark Klein, and Catholijn M. Jonker (2018). A Machine Learning Approach for Mechanism Selection in Complex Negotiations. 
  • Systems Science and Systems Engineering , 27:134–155. 
  • Spada, P., Iandoli, L., Quinto, I., Calabretta, R., & Klein, M. (2017). Argumentation vs Ideation in online political debate: evidence from an experiment of collective deliberation. New Media & Society. 
  • Klein, M., & Garca, A-C-B. (2015). High-Speed Idea Filtering With the Bag of Lemons. Decision Support Systems, 78(C):39-50. 
  • Marsa-Maestre, I., Klein, M., Jonker, C. M., Lopez-Carmona, M. A., & Aydogan, R. (2014). From Problems to Protocols: Towards a Negotiation Handbook. Decision Support Systems, 60:39-54. 
  • Klein, M. (2012). Enabling Large-Scale Deliberation Using Attention-Mediation Metrics. Computer-Supported Collaborative Work. 21(4):449-473 
  • Bernstein, A., M. Klein and T. Malone .(2012). Programming the Global Brain. Communications of the ACM 55(5). 

Professor Emile SERVAN-SCHREIBER

Dr. Emile Servan-Schreiber is an affiliate professor at SCI and a founding director of Hypermind, a leading prediction-markets company since 2000. His research and practice focus on applying crowd wisdom to forecasting and prioritization. He has participated in several large-scale research programs of the U.S. (IARPA) on crowd-based forecasting of geopolitical events. He earned a Ph.D in cognitive psychology at Carnegie Mellon (1991). His latest book is Supercollectif (Fayard, 2018).

“I research ways to exploit crowd wisdom, through prediction markets and related technologies, to make organizations smarter through more accurate forecasting, richer innovation, and better alignment. The research field covers at least (a) the development of new aggregation algorithms building on the existing state of the art, (b) the testing/training of individuals and crowds to push the forecasting envelope, (c) the efficient combination of collective intelligence and artificial intelligence.”

Representative Publications 

  • Servan-Schreiber, E. (2018). Supercollectif – La nouvelle puissance de nos intelligences. Fayard, Paris. 
  • Servan-Schreiber, E. (2017). Debunking Three Myths About Crowd-Based Forecasting. Collective Intelligence 2017, NYU Tandon. 
  • Atanasov, P., Rescober, P., Stone, E., Swift, S., Servan-Schreiber, E., Tetlock, P., Ungar, L., & Mellers, B. (2016). Distilling the Wisdom of Crowds: Prediction markets vs. Prediction Polls. Management Science, Articles in Advance, pp. 1-16. 
  • Servan-Schreiber, E., & Atanasov, P. (2016). Hypermind vs Big Data : Collective Intelligence Still Dominates Electoral Forecasting. Collective Intelligence 2015, Santa Clara. 
  • Servan-Schreiber, E. (2012). Prediction Markets: Trading Uncertainty for Collective Wisdom. In Collective Wisdom – Landemore, H., & Elster, J. (Eds). Cambridge University Press. 
  • Servan-Schreiber, E., Wolfers, J., Pennock, D., & Galebach, B. (2004). Prediciton Markets: Does Money Matter? Electronic Markets, 14(3): 243-251. 

Professor FatimaZzahra BENMARRAKCHI

Dr FatimaEzzahra Benmarrakchi is an Assistant Professor at SCI . She received a PhD. in computer science from Chouaib Doukkali University. Her research focuses on how the use of technology can foster learning outcomes and improve cognitive and social skills for children with learning disabilities (e.g. Dyslexia) and Autism Spectrum Disorder.

In the SCI she is leading research on collaborative learning.

“My work is in the field of educational technology and special education, it focuses on how the use of ICT (Information and Communication technology) can improve learning. Exploring the potential benefits offered by ICT to support children with learning disabilities such as dyslexia. I have conducted a range of experimental research programs aimed at children with learning disabilities in order to developing interactive experiences that can motivate and help target learners.”

Representative Publications: 

Professor James WINTERS

Dr. Winters is an Assistant Professor at the School of Collective Intelligence working in the domains of cognitive science, cultural evolution, and linguistics. Previously, he was a postdoctoral researcher at the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, and earned his PhD in Linguistics at the University of Edinburgh. His current research employs a variety of methodological tools (computational, statistical, and experimental) to investigate exploration-exploitation dynamics in cumulative cultural evolution.

“Why are humans the only species capable of open-ended, cumulative problem solving? How did this capacity evolve and become manifest in our language, technology, and culture? My research seeks to address such questions by drawing on theoretical and methodological approaches from cognitive science, evolutionary biology, and complexity science, with the explicit aim of capturing the relationship between individual-level processes and population-level patterns.”

Representative Publications 

Professor Florencia DEVOTO

Dr. Florencia is an affiliate professor at the School of Collective Intelligence. She undertakes experimental work in the field of development economics. She holds a PhD from the Paris School of Economics and an MPA/International Development from the Harvard Kennedy School.

“My research focuses on measuring the impacts of tools and policies on the decisions of poor households in developing countries and how these decisions may differ from those predicted by the classical economic theory. I conduct randomized control trials to explore a variety of questions in the areas of education, microfinance, female labor force participation and access to water. By conducting this work, I intend to contribute to the understanding of the mechanisms through which policies can help alleviating poverty.”

Representative Publications 

Professor Brent STRICKLAND

Dr. Strickland is an affiliate professor at the School of Collective Intelligence and Africa Business School, and one of the original co-founders of the School of Collective Intelligence. He is also a tenured CNRS researcher at the Institut Jean Nicod/Departement d’Etudes Cognitives/ENS-Ulm/PSL in Paris, France. He holds a PhD in cognitive and developmental psychology from the Yale University Psychology Department. 

Core knowledge refers to a set of cognitive systems that appear very early in human development, universally across cultures, and are preserved by natural selection. My research asks how core knowledge continues to operate into adulthood in automatic and often unconscious ways, with a focus on perception, language, and decision making. I am additionally interested in how such core mechanisms may systematically affect human behavior at organizational or societal scale.”

Representative Publications: 

Sarah ALAMI

Dr. Sarah is a Research and Education Fellow at the School of Collective Intelligence. She is an anthropologist and a biodemographer who conducts fieldwork with economically transitioning populations in Southeast Morocco and lowland Bolivia.

She holds an MA and a PhD in Anthropology from the university of California, Santa Barbara. Sarah studies a number of different topics relating to behavior and health.

Her current research projects are in one or more of the following areas: 

  • Kinship and marriage systems 
  • Evolution of human sociality and intergroup relationships 
  • Gender , gender norms and leadership 
  • Health, lifestyle change, and evolutionary demography

Professor Jose Segovia MARTIN

Dr. Jose Segovia-Martin is currently a Professor at the School of Collective Intelligence (M6 Polytechnic University) and a CNRS Research Associate at Complex Systems Institute of Paris Ile-de-France (ISC-PIF), where he also was a postdoc researcher. Previously, he completed his PhD in Cognitive Science at the Universitat de Barcelona. During his PhD he obtained relevant training in computational social science and mathematical engineering: a significant part of his research was developed at the Centre for Language Evolution (University of Edinburgh) and the Laland Lab (University of St.Andrews). 

“My scientific work concerns the evolution of collective behaviour. I use mathematical and computational models, as well as experiments and data science, to study the interaction between cognition, behaviour and social organisation, with a perspective rooted in cultural evolution and complex systems. My research interests span the domains of social cognition, behavioural economics, decision theory, computational biology and language evolution. I am interested in questions such as how social conventions emerge in the presence and absence of institutional incentives, what special features of human social learning and innovation enable cumulative cultural evolution, how different aggregation rules shape collective outcomes such as the degree of consensus and polarisation in a society, or how social dynamics and norms interfere with the quality of scientific production. These models, in combination with empirical verification and validation, provide a method to explore possible ways of estimating the economic and social trade-offs involved in preserving cultural diversity, addressing inequalities and improving governance.”

Representative Publications